Feedback Loops in Pure Data

Recently I’ve been making a few video loops for Dreambait Recordings to use in their shows. The videos, made using video samples and Pure Data, focus on feedback loops. For BYOB Birmingham on Friday 16th March I decided to showcase these video feedbcak creations. Some photos of it in action:

BYOB Birmingham

BYOB Birmingham Flatpack Festival 2012

Photo by minuek

The Pure Data patch used to make these visuals, inspired by this patch is pretty simple: Put an object on screen, take a snapshot of the screen and then apply that snapshot as a texture to another object. You can download it below

Feedback Loops patch

Click to download

As a texture for the cube I used the Skin Cells video again. You could replace this with any video, image or webcam feed. The [pix_contrast] object is there purely to provide an over-saturated look (try bringing Saturation to a negative number). For BYOB I automated the controls by using random number generators (feeding [random] into [metro]). Here’s a render of what the audience saw:

All that is needed now is some cool audio to go with it! Thanks to all those that came to BYOB to see this and other awesome artworks!

Random date generator

Planning any sort of meeting? Don’t leave it to common sense to decide on the most appropriate time, use this random date generator instead!

Click to download

Click to download

Originally built for a.a.s, you can download a copy for yourself. Once loaded press Enter to stop on a date. The date is generated in the format dd/MM/yy/hh/mm/ss. You’ll need Processing and the Commodore 64 font (convert it using Processing), though you can use any font if you want.

Graffiti Analysis at Inside Out

For Inside Out Festival on 24th September I demoed Evan Roth’s Graffiti Analysis software. The hoardings outside Friction Arts’ building have just been dying to be tagged, so I felt this software would give the opportunity to do so, but in a very safe method.

You can see some still shots here on Flickr and even download the tags for your own viewing pleasure. For this there were a few tasks to overcome. The Graffiti Analysis capture and playback software has reached version 3, but only for Mac’s (at the moment). Version 2, which is available for Windows and Linux is still very capable. However, for Linux, the files created in the capture application don’t work with the playback application. They create their own .graf files and the playback application can only handle .gml files. d’oh! Luckily I was able to enlist the skills of the ever talented Andrew Thomas, who created a Processing script that converts between the two files (tested on version 1.1). You can download this and try it for yourself. It hasn’t failed me so far!

Click to download the sketch

Click to download the sketch

As I was using this rather tricky technique of capturing the light I had to strap a few lights to a glove to ensure enough light was emitted and captured. I highly recommend that you try this for yourself, with or without a real pen 😉

Echobender

Myself and Mez recently finished a script called Echobender that automatically databends images.

Click to view on GitHub

To use it you’ll need:

  • A computer with Linux installed. I don’t have a Windows or Mac PC so I can’t test it on those
  • Sox. On Ubuntu you can install it via sudo apt-get install sox
  • Convert, which is part of ImageMagick. On Ubuntu you can install it via sudo apt-get install imagemagick

Once you have those installed just execute ./echobender.sh from the terminal and then drop a .jpg or .bmp file into it. The output will be in a folder called “echo”.

If you look closely at the script you can see a way to convert any data into an image! I’ll leave that one up to you… Here’s the source code for all those interested:

Thanks to Imbecil‘s MPegFucker script for much of the inspiration.