Basquiat’s Brain, 12th – 28th January 2018

From 12th – 28th January a series of animated portraits, developed in response to the Boom for Real Basquiat exhibition, will be on display at Barbican.

Barbican young creatives, along with artist and curator Antonio Roberts,聽present a collection of work in response to Basquiat: Boom for Real

Artist and curator Antonio Roberts worked with a group of Barbican young creatives over three months to create artwork in response to the exhibition Basquiat: Boom for Real currently showing in the Barbican Art Gallery.

Over the course of four sessions the group examined artist Jean-Michel Basquiat鈥檚 explosive creativity and imagined the techniques and methods he might use if he was still creating art today.

The resulting animations combine more traditional methods of creation such as photography and collage, with more experimental practices such as glitch art, digital collages, animated gifs and projections. Each animated selfportrait reflects the identity of the artist who created it.

Artists:

  • Max Baraitser Smith
  • Isabella Barbaro
  • Alex Cole
  • Hector Dyer
  • Antonio Roberts

The animations will be projected near the exit of the curve exhibition space where people are often studying. It’s hard to miss as it has my big face on it.

Many thanks to the Barbican Creative Learning team for inviting me to do this 馃檪

C贸RM

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A series of self-portraits. The title comes from a random string that was found in one of the images

More here

Making Skin Cells

The making of Skin Cells was quite a long process. It started projecting my Bunnies video onto me and filming this. I then took this and ran it through the What Glitch? sgi script to create a glitched version of the video, leaving me with two versions of the video.

Skin Cells

Skin Cells

When it came to merging the two videos together I took some inspiration from Tidepool by Tabor Robak. Putting the videos on top of each other I wanted to use chromakeying to reveal parts of the video at the bottom at the same time as really oversaturating the video. For this I employed the help of Pure Data:

Skin Cells Pure Data patch

By using [pix_chroma_key] and setting the [range( to random values the patch was constantly hiding and revealing random parts of the videos. Some wizardry in Gridflow gave the videos that oversaturated look.

If you want to try this patch for yourself go ahead and download it. Although it may work on other setups, I used the following:

To use the patch, first load a directory of videos, create the GEM window and then press the big red start button. A video is automatically saved (using PDP), though do be careful as these files get very large very quickly! If, for any reason, saving the video doesn’t work just delete the line going from [#from_pix, colorspace rgb] to [#to_pdp].

If any assistance is required please direct your attention to this thread on the Pure Data forum.

Skin Cells

Skin cells breaking up.

Made using a mixture of Pure Data, Gridflow and Din.

Family Build Up

#336A96

One of the most common questions I, and possibly any other digital artist gets when they present their work is how they do it. I occasionally reveal some of my methods in my tutorials but otherwise I like to show screenshots taken at various stages. I came across this build up script a few months back and have now finally got it to work! Here’s my previous family portrait being reconstructed:

This script isn’t a true reflection of how I drew it but gives a good idea about the amount of detail I go into with my work. The reason I didn’t finish it is that I had already had the script running for ten hours and it was only half finished! Luckily there’s options to resume, but at this rate I’ll be doing it until February!

I think I may do this a lot more with my work.

Family Portrait

After seeing some of my recent work I was asked to do a family portrait. The last time I did a portrait on such a large scale was in 2007 in Adobe Illustrator and the last time I did a realistic portrait was probably back in 2006 of an old photographer buddy. I’ve been using Inkscape for just over a year now and whilst I’ve been doing little bits and pieces I haven’t actually done a major illustration.

As always I started with the outline first and filled it in with basic colours. I used GIMP and a very useful cutout filter to help me visualise how I was going to layer the colours and shapes that I needed. From there it was a simple case of refining and perfecting! Have a look at some of the progress shots:

1 2 3 4

The finished product looks like so and is probably my favourite piece this year:

The finished family portrait

The finished family portrait

The finished result was printed onto a canvas and is mounted on their wall. Yay!

If you’re that kinda person you can have a look at the wireframe of the image:

wireframe 1 wireframe 2 wireframe 3 wireframe 4

Overall working in Inkscape was quite easy in terms of drawing. One bit of praise I often hear about it is its drawing and node editing tools, and it really did feel quite easy to draw this. However, there are two areas where I feel Inkscape hindered my creativity in creating this piece.

The first is how it implements brushes. Inkscape does this by using the Pattern Along Path Live Path Effect, which in some instances can be more useful than Illustrator’s brush tools. What I feel some users want is for the pattern to act as the stroke of a path and to still be able to edit the fill of a path. This would’ve been very useful for me when drawing the hair.

The second is it’s lack of extensive layer blending modes. Currently Inkscape has five layer blend modes, which includes normal/no blend and these can only be implemented on layers, not individual objects. As far as I know you were able to set the blend mode for each paths in 0.44, but it was removed for technical reasons. I achieved the effects in my earlier work by, at times, combining over ten different blend modes on individual objects. Take a look at this walkthrough by popular vector artist verucasalt82 and you’ll see why it can be quite handy. So, in the absence of blend modes for individual paths could we see a few more blend modes, overlay in particular?

With all of that said, you can see that Inkscape is still a very capable program. I overcame many of the problems I described by just doing things a little different than usual.

Portrait for Nick Duxbury

I got a pleasant surprise today. Not even two days after publishing my post on basic portraits do I get asked to do a portrait.

Nick Duxbury

This is a portrait of Nick Duxbury an artist who used to be based in Birmingham but now resides in Scotland.

I used the same methods explained in my previous post except that I took the finished sketch into Inkscape to clean it up a bit. A good move considering the original picture had quite an elongated face!

Halftone Portrait

Here’s the last in my daily pictures for this week. I’ve a busy weekend of parties and more parties, so I’ll do a whole week of drawing another week.

I’ve spent most of my day feeling a little bit ill and learning how to use Blender, so this is more of an experiment than anything. I used a tutorial by istarlome to create this. I found that if you check the Colour option under the Trace tab it will attempt to colour the image as well. Using Inkscape to create halftones could well be a powerful way to do it and gives you many options for editing and customisation.

Hope you’ve enjoyed this week of pictures!

Self Portrait [wip] pt2

Here’s another screenshot.

Having some problems with the hair though…