Glitch Art Workshops

Glitch art is a form of art that is created by introducing digital or analog errors to media.

Join MakoEducation and Near Now Fellow Antonio Roberts in this glitch art workshop which teaches participants what glitch art is and how to create their own artwork.

Attendees will learn how to create glitch art images, videos and GIFs. We’ll be encouraging artists of the future to experiment with new tools and techniques.

Attendees learn a range of digital skills in the areas of photography, image editing and video production.

No previous experience is necessary to take part in this workshop.

PLEASE NOTE THIS EVENT IS AIMED AT CHILDREN AGED 8-13. ADULTS PERMITTED ONLY TO ACCOMPANY CHILDREN. ALL CHILDREN MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT.

Granular Colloquium

Utilising a range of formats from audio-visual performance to talks, this event is an experiential investigation of noise as a granular entity. State changes are a central theme. Processes of disintegration and/or reintegration of material elements at a granular level are explored, both as the mode of transference between states (whether physical or digital) and the means by which a thing starts or ceases to be.

The colloquium will take place from 10 am – 5pm at The University of Greenwich, Stockwell Street Building and is held in association with the exhibition Granular: The Material Properties of Noise. The event will be followed by a private viewing of the exhibition.

Chaired by Dr. Stephen Kennedy, University of Greenwich, Department of Creative Professions and Digital Arts
(author: Chaos Media: A Sonic Economy of Digital Space – Bloomsbury 2015)
Keynote: Greg Hainge , University of Queensland, Associate Professor, School of Languages and Cultures
(author: Noise Matters: Towards an Ontology of Noise – Bloomsbury 2013)
Contributors include Russell Duke, Jane Grant, Antonio Roberts, Dr David Ryan, Charles Danby and Rob Smith.

Tickets cost £10 (£5 for students) and are available via this link to our Eventbrite page. Tickets include free access to the performance of “Recitativo” on Friday 26th January.

Granular: The Material Properties of Noise, 16th January – 3rd February

From 16th January – 3rd February my 2016 piece Transformative Use will be on show at University of Greenwich as part of Granular: The Material Properties of Noise.

Granular noise is explored as a condition of material transfer in this exhibition. A central concern across the works on display is the material state change that occurs within the processes of mediation. Here, disintegration and/or reintegration of elements at a granular level is encountered as a mode of transference between states, whether physical or digital, and as a phase at which a thing starts or ceases to be.

Exhibiting artists include: Jim Hobbs, Benjamin McDonnell, Antonio Roberts, David Ryan, Audrey Samson and Rob Smith.

The exhibition features my work Transformative Use, which was originally commissioned by Hannah Pierce for the Common Property exhibition in 2016. It’s the first time it’s been exhibited since then. If you want to see some work-in-progress installation shots check out my all new arty Instagram account.

Alongside the exhibition is the Granular Colloquium, taking place on 27th January:

Utilising a range of formats from audio-visual performance to talks, this event is an experiential investigation of noise as a granular entity. State changes are a central theme. Processes of disintegration and/or reintegration of material elements at a granular level are explored, both as the mode of transference between states (whether physical or digital) and the means by which a thing starts or ceases to be.

I’ll be at that, talking a bit about glitch and its relation to copyright, as well as regular ol’ copyright. Tickets are £10.

If you didn’t get the chance to see Transformative Use in 2016 now is a great time to see a new and updated configuration of it.

Granular: The Material Properties of Noise

Granular noise is explored as a condition of material transfer in this exhibition. A central concern across the works on display is the material state change that occurs within the processes of mediation. Here, disintegration and/or reintegration of elements at a granular level is encountered as a mode of transference between states, whether physical or digital, and as a phase at which a thing starts or ceases to be.

Exhibiting artists include: Jim Hobbs, Benjamin McDonnell, Antonio Roberts, David Ryan, Audrey Samson and Rob Smith.

This exhibition is running in association with the events Granular Performance (Recitativo) and Colloquium, which are held at Stockwell Street on Friday 26th January and Saturday 27th January respectively.

Basquiat’s Brain, 12th – 28th January 2018

From 12th – 28th January a series of animated portraits, developed in response to the Boom for Real Basquiat exhibition, will be on display at Barbican.

Barbican young creatives, along with artist and curator Antonio Roberts, present a collection of work in response to Basquiat: Boom for Real

Artist and curator Antonio Roberts worked with a group of Barbican young creatives over three months to create artwork in response to the exhibition Basquiat: Boom for Real currently showing in the Barbican Art Gallery.

Over the course of four sessions the group examined artist Jean-Michel Basquiat’s explosive creativity and imagined the techniques and methods he might use if he was still creating art today.

The resulting animations combine more traditional methods of creation such as photography and collage, with more experimental practices such as glitch art, digital collages, animated gifs and projections. Each animated selfportrait reflects the identity of the artist who created it.

Artists:

  • Max Baraitser Smith
  • Isabella Barbaro
  • Alex Cole
  • Hector Dyer
  • Antonio Roberts

The animations will be projected near the exit of the curve exhibition space where people are often studying. It’s hard to miss as it has my big face on it.

Many thanks to the Barbican Creative Learning team for inviting me to do this 🙂

Algomech Algorave

At AlgoMech 2017 we aim to take Algorave to the next level, bringing together some of the best algorithmic (and mechanical) dance music producers and VJs, playing over Sheffield’s fiendish DangerNoise soundsystem, with immersive projections covering the walls of Millennium Gallery. As with the rest of the festival we’ll be mixing mechanisms with the algorithms, showcasing repetitive dance music made from handmade robots as well as live code.

Algorave Green Man

An algorave is a party where electronic music and visuals are generated live from algorithms. The word was coined around 2012, initially as a joke, but has since taken hold with Algoraves taking place in over 40 cities around the world. At an Algorave, the creation of algorithms are brought into the experience of the music itself. This process is opened up by projecting the code on screens in the venue, so audience members can see how the music they hear is being made. This is often complimented by algorithmically generated visuals projected alongside the code.

Green Man Festival

Antonio Roberts is a new-media artist and curator based in Birmingham. His practice focuses on the errors and glitches generated by digital technology. For Green Man 2017 he will create a new work inspired by seeing Battles at the festival last year. “Mirrored” (named after Battles’ first album) is a number of perspex cubes between 60 and 100cm square, each etched with his characteristic imagery depicting scenes from the festival. “Mirrored” is a development of recent work made for Short Circuit Project, Copenhagen. It builds on a recent interest in presenting his work off-screen and he will be working outdoors for the first time. Antonio will also participate in Algorave, a late night event where electronic music is generated from live algorithms.

Algorave – Bluedot Festival

Bluedot with OVO Energy is an award-winning festival of discovery at the grounds of a deep space observatory. Set against a backdrop of the iconic Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank, bluedot combines a truly stellar line-up of music with a ground-breaking programme of live science experiments, expert talks and immersive artworks.

An Algorave is a party where electronic music is generated live from algorithms. The word was coined around 2012, initially as a kind of joke, but has since taken hold with Algoraves taking place in over 40 cities around the world.

At an Algorave, the creation of algorithms are brought into the experience of the music itself. This process is opened up by projecting the code on screens in the venue, so audience members can see how the music they hear is being made. This is often complimented by algorithmically generated visuals projected alongside the code.